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Your data is impor­tant to us.

Privacy

The pro­tec­tion of your per­son­al data is very impor­tant to us. We there­fore treat your data respon­si­bly, care­ful­ly and in accor­dance with the statu­to­ry data pro­tec­tion reg­u­la­tions (in par­tic­u­lar DSG and DSGVO).
Below we inform you about how we process your per­son­al data. For a better overview, our infor­ma­tion is divided into dif­fer­ent subject sec­tions — so you can find the data pro­cess­ing and infor­ma­tion that applies to you more quickly.

Use of our website

We have written this privacy policy (version 13.07.2022–112059870) in order to explain to you, in accor­dance with the pro­vi­sions of the General Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion (EU) 2016/679 and applic­a­ble nation­al laws, which per­son­al data (data for short) we as the con­troller – and the proces­sors com­mis­sioned by us (e.g. providers) – process, will process in the future and what legal options you have. The terms used are to be con­sid­ered as gender-neutral.
In short: We provide you with com­pre­hen­sive infor­ma­tion about any per­son­al data we process about you.

Privacy poli­cies usually sound very tech­ni­cal and use legal ter­mi­nol­o­gy. However, this privacy policy is intend­ed to describe the most impor­tant things to you as simply and trans­par­ent­ly as pos­si­ble. So long as it aids trans­paren­cy, tech­ni­cal terms are explained in a reader-friend­ly manner, links to further infor­ma­tion are pro­vid­ed and graph­ics are used. We are thus inform­ing in clear and simple lan­guage that we only process per­son­al data in the context of our busi­ness activ­i­ties if there is a legal basis for it. This is cer­tain­ly not pos­si­ble with brief, unclear and legal-tech­ni­cal state­ments, as is often stan­dard on the Inter­net when it comes to data pro­tec­tion. I hope you find the fol­low­ing expla­na­tions inter­est­ing and infor­ma­tive. Maybe you will also find some infor­ma­tion that you have not been famil­iar with.
If you still have ques­tions, we would like to ask you to contact the respon­si­ble body named below or in the imprint, to follow the exist­ing links and to look at further infor­ma­tion on third-party sites. You can of course also find our contact details in the imprint.

Scope

This privacy policy applies to all per­son­al data processed by our company and to all per­son­al data processed by com­pa­nies com­mis­sioned by us (proces­sors). With the term per­son­al data, we refer to infor­ma­tion within the meaning of Article 4 No. 1 GDPR, such as the name, email address and postal address of a person. The pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data ensures that we can offer and invoice our ser­vices and prod­ucts, be it online or offline. The scope of this privacy policy includes:

  • all online pres­ences (web­sites, online shops) that we operate
  • Social media pres­ences and email communication
  • mobile apps for smart­phones and other devices

In short: This privacy policy applies to all areas in which per­son­al data is processed in a struc­tured manner by the company via the chan­nels men­tioned. Should we enter into legal rela­tions with you outside of these chan­nels, we will inform you sep­a­rate­ly if necessary.

Legal bases

In the fol­low­ing privacy policy, we provide you with trans­par­ent infor­ma­tion on the legal prin­ci­ples and reg­u­la­tions, i.e. the legal bases of the General Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion, which enable us to process per­son­al data.
When­ev­er EU law is con­cerned, we refer to REGULATION (EU) 2016/679 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of April 27, 2016. You can of course access the General Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion of the EU online at EUR-Lex, the gateway to EU law, at https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=celex%3A32016R0679.

We only process your data if at least one of the fol­low­ing con­di­tions applies:

  1. Consent (Article 6 Para­graph 1 lit. a GDPR): You have given us your consent to process data for a spe­cif­ic purpose. An example would be the storage of data you entered into a contact form.
  2. Con­tract (Article 6 Para­graph 1 lit. b GDPR): We process your data in order to fulfill a con­tract or pre-con­trac­tu­al oblig­a­tions with you. For example, if we con­clude a sales con­tract with you, we need per­son­al infor­ma­tion in advance.
  3. Legal oblig­a­tion (Article 6 Para­graph 1 lit. c GDPR): If we are subject to a legal oblig­a­tion, we will process your data. For example, we are legally required to keep invoic­es for our book­keep­ing. These usually contain per­son­al data.
  4. Legit­i­mate inter­ests (Article 6 Para­graph 1 lit. f GDPR): In the case of legit­i­mate inter­ests that do not restrict your basic rights, we reserve the right to process per­son­al data. For example, we have to process certain data in order to be able to operate our website secure­ly and eco­nom­i­cal­ly. There­fore, the pro­cess­ing is a legit­i­mate interest.

Other con­di­tions such as making record­ings in the inter­est of the public, the exer­cise of offi­cial author­i­ty as well as the pro­tec­tion of vital inter­ests do not usually occur with us. Should such a legal basis be rel­e­vant, it will be dis­closed in the appro­pri­ate place.

In addi­tion to the EU reg­u­la­tion, nation­al laws also apply:

  • In Austria this is the Aus­tri­an Data Pro­tec­tion Act (Daten­schutzge­setz), in short DSG.
  • In Germany this is the Federal Data Pro­tec­tion Act (Bun­des­daten­schutzge­setz), in short BDSG.

Should other region­al or nation­al laws apply, we will inform you about them in the fol­low­ing sections.

Contact details of the data pro­tec­tion controller

If you have any ques­tions about data pro­tec­tion, you will find the contact details of the respon­si­ble person or con­troller below:
Röhren- und Pumpen­werk BAUER
Kowald­straße 2
A‑8570 Voitsberg/Austria

Tel: +43 3142 200–0
Fax: +43 3142 200–205
E‑Mail: bauer@bauer-at.com

Company details: https://www.bauer-at.com/en/imprint/

Storage Period

It is a general cri­te­ri­on for us to store per­son­al data only for as long as is absolute­ly nec­es­sary for the pro­vi­sion of our ser­vices and prod­ucts. This means that we delete per­son­al data as soon as any reason for the data pro­cess­ing no longer exists. In some cases, we are legally obliged to keep certain data stored even after the orig­i­nal purpose no longer exists, such as for account­ing purposes.

If you want your data to be deleted or if you want to revoke your consent to data pro­cess­ing, the data will be deleted as soon as pos­si­ble, pro­vid­ed there is no oblig­a­tion to con­tin­ue its storage.

We will inform you below about the spe­cif­ic dura­tion of the respec­tive data pro­cess­ing, pro­vid­ed we have further information.

Rights in accor­dance with the General Data Pro­tec­tion Regulation

In accor­dance with Arti­cles 13, 14 of the GDPR, we inform you about the fol­low­ing rights you have to ensure fair and trans­par­ent pro­cess­ing of data:

  • Accord­ing to Article 15 DSGVO, you have the right to infor­ma­tion about whether we are pro­cess­ing data about you. If this is the case, you have the right to receive a copy of the data and to know the fol­low­ing information: 
    • for what purpose we are processing;
    • the cat­e­gories, i.e. the types of data that are processed;
    • who receives this data and if the data is trans­ferred to third coun­tries, how secu­ri­ty can be guaranteed;
    • how long the data will be stored;
    • the exis­tence of the right to rec­ti­fi­ca­tion, erasure or restric­tion of pro­cess­ing and the right to object to processing;
    • that you can lodge a com­plaint with a super­vi­so­ry author­i­ty (links to these author­i­ties can be found below);
    • the origin of the data if we have not col­lect­ed it from you;
    • Whether pro­fil­ing is carried out, i.e. whether data is auto­mat­i­cal­ly eval­u­at­ed to arrive at a per­son­al profile of you.
  • You have a right to rec­ti­fi­ca­tion of data accord­ing to Article 16 GDPR, which means that we must correct data if you find errors.
  • You have the right to erasure (“right to be for­got­ten”) accord­ing to Article 17 GDPR, which specif­i­cal­ly means that you may request the dele­tion of your data.
  • Accord­ing to Article 18 of the GDPR, you have the right to restric­tion of pro­cess­ing, which means that we may only store the data but not use it further.
  • Accord­ing to Article 20 of the GDPR, you have the right to data porta­bil­i­ty, which means that we will provide you with your data in a stan­dard format upon request.
  • Accord­ing to Article 21 DSGVO, you have the right to object, which entails a change in pro­cess­ing after enforcement. 
    • If the pro­cess­ing of your data is based on Article 6(1)(e) (public inter­est, exer­cise of offi­cial author­i­ty) or Article 6(1)(f) (legit­i­mate inter­est), you may object to the pro­cess­ing. We will then check as soon as pos­si­ble whether we can legally comply with this objection.
    • If data is used to conduct direct adver­tis­ing, you may object to this type of data pro­cess­ing at any time. We may then no longer use your data for direct marketing.
    • If data is used to conduct pro­fil­ing, you may object to this type of data pro­cess­ing at any time. We may no longer use your data for pro­fil­ing thereafter.
  • Accord­ing to Article 22 of the GDPR, you may have the right not to be subject to a deci­sion based solely on auto­mat­ed pro­cess­ing (for example, profiling).
  • You have the right to lodge a com­plaint under Article 77 of the GDPR. This means that you can com­plain to the data pro­tec­tion author­i­ty at any time if you believe that the data pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data vio­lates the GDPR.

In short: you have rights – do not hes­i­tate to contact the respon­si­ble party listed above with us!

If you believe that the pro­cess­ing of your data vio­lates data pro­tec­tion law or your data pro­tec­tion rights have been vio­lat­ed in any other way, you can com­plain to the super­vi­so­ry author­i­ty. For Austria, this is the data pro­tec­tion author­i­ty, whose website can be found at https://www.dsb.gv.at/. In Germany, there is a data pro­tec­tion officer for each federal state. For more infor­ma­tion, you can contact the Federal Com­mis­sion­er for Data Pro­tec­tion and Freedom of Infor­ma­tion (BfDI). The fol­low­ing local data pro­tec­tion author­i­ty is respon­si­ble for our company:

Austria Data pro­tec­tion authority

Manager: Mag. Dr. Andrea Jelinek

Address: Barich­gasse 40–42, 1030 Wien

Phone number.: +43 1 52 152–0

E‑mail address:
dsb@dsb.gv.at

Website:
https://www.dsb.gv.at/

Secu­ri­ty of data pro­cess­ing operations

In order to protect per­son­al data, we have imple­ment­ed both tech­ni­cal and organ­i­sa­tion­al mea­sures. We encrypt or pseu­do­nymise per­son­al data wher­ev­er this is pos­si­ble. Thus, we make it as dif­fi­cult as we can for third parties to extract per­son­al infor­ma­tion from our data.

Article 25 of the GDPR refers to “data pro­tec­tion by tech­ni­cal design and by data pro­tec­tion-friend­ly default” which means that both soft­ware (e.g. forms) and hard­ware (e.g. access to server rooms) appro­pri­ate safe­guards and secu­ri­ty mea­sures shall always be placed. If applic­a­ble, we will outline the spe­cif­ic mea­sures below.

TLS encryp­tion with https

The terms TLS, encryp­tion and https sound very tech­ni­cal, which they are indeed. We use HTTPS (Hyper­text Trans­fer Pro­to­col Secure) to secure­ly trans­fer data on the Internet.
This means that the entire trans­mis­sion of all data from your browser to our web server is secured – nobody can “listen in”.

We have thus intro­duced an addi­tion­al layer of secu­ri­ty and meet privacy require­ments through tech­nol­o­gy design Article 25 Section 1 GDPR). With the use of TLS (Trans­port Layer Secu­ri­ty), which is an encryp­tion pro­to­col for safe data trans­fer on the inter­net, we can ensure the pro­tec­tion of con­fi­den­tial information.
You can recog­nise the use of this safe­guard­ing tool by the little lock-symbol , which is sit­u­at­ed in your browser’s top left corner in the left of the inter­net address (e.g. examplepage.uk), as well as by the display of the letters https (instead of http) as a part of our web address.
If you want to know more about encryp­tion, we rec­om­mend you to do a Google search for “Hyper­text Trans­fer Pro­to­col Secure wiki” to find good links to further information.

Cookies

Cookies Overview 

Affect­ed parties: vis­i­tors to the website
Purpose: depend­ing on the respec­tive cookie. You can find out more details below or from the soft­ware man­u­fac­tur­er that sets the cookie.
Processed data: Depend­ing on the cookie used. More details can be found below or from the man­u­fac­tur­er of the soft­ware that sets the cookie.
Storage dura­tion: can vary from hours to years, depend­ing on the respec­tive cookie
Legal basis: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What are cookies?

Our website uses HTTP-cookies to store user-spe­cif­ic data.
In the fol­low­ing we explain what cookies are and why they are used, so that you can better under­stand the fol­low­ing privacy policy.

When­ev­er you surf the Inter­net, you are using a browser. Common browsers are for example, Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Inter­net Explor­er and Microsoft Edge. Most web­sites store small text-files in your browser. These files are called cookies.

It is impor­tant to note that cookies are very useful little helpers. Almost every website uses cookies. More pre­cise­ly, these are HTTP cookies, as there are also other cookies for other uses. HTTP cookies are small files that our website stores on your com­put­er. These cookie files are auto­mat­i­cal­ly placed into the cookie-folder, which is the “brain” of your browser. A cookie con­sists of a name and a value. More­over, to define a cookie, one or mul­ti­ple attrib­ut­es must be specified.

Cookies store certain user data about you, such as lan­guage or per­son­al page set­tings. When you re-open our website to visit again, your browser submits these “user-related” infor­ma­tion back to our site. Thanks to cookies, our website knows who you are and offers you the set­tings you are famil­iar to. In some browsers, each cookie has its own file, while in others, such as Firefox, all cookies are stored in one single file.

There are both first-party cookies and third-party cookies. First-party cookies are created direct­ly by our site, while third-party cookies are created by partner-web­sites (e.g. Google Ana­lyt­ics). Each cookie must be eval­u­at­ed indi­vid­u­al­ly, as each cookie stores dif­fer­ent data. The expiry time of a cookie also varies from a few minutes to a few years. Cookies are not soft­ware pro­grams and do not contain viruses, trojans or other malware. Cookies also cannot access your PC’s information.

This is an example of how cookie-files can look:

Name: _ga
Value: GA1.2.1326744211.152112059870–9
Purpose: Dif­fer­en­ti­a­tion between website visitors
Expiry date: after 2 years

A browser should support these minimum sizes:

  • At least 4096 bytes per cookie
  • At least 50 cookies per domain
  • At least 3000 cookies in total

Which types of cookies are there?

The exact cookies that we use, depend on the used ser­vices, which will be out­lined in the fol­low­ing sec­tions of this privacy policy. Firstly, we will briefly focus on the dif­fer­ent types of HTTP-cookies.

There are 4 dif­fer­ent types of cookies:

Essen­tial cookies
These cookies are nec­es­sary to ensure the basic func­tions of a website. They are needed when a user for example puts a product into their shop­ping cart, then con­tin­ues surfing on dif­fer­ent web­sites and comes back later in order to proceed to the check­out. These cookies ensure the shop­ping cart does not get deleted, even if the user closes their browser window.

Pur­po­sive cookies
These cookies collect infor­ma­tion about user behav­iour and whether the user receives any error mes­sages. Fur­ther­more, these cookies record the website’s loading time as well as its behav­iour in dif­fer­ent browsers.

Target-ori­en­tat­ed cookies
These cookies ensure better user-friend­li­ness. Thus, infor­ma­tion such as pre­vi­ous­ly entered loca­tions, fonts sizes or data in forms stay stored.

Adver­tis­ing cookies
These cookies are also known as tar­get­ing cookies. They serve the purpose of deliv­er­ing cus­tomised adver­tise­ments to the user. This can be very prac­ti­cal, but also rather annoying.

Upon your first visit to a website you are usually asked which of these cookie-types you want to accept. Fur­ther­more, this deci­sion will of course also be stored in a cookie.

If you want to learn more about cookies and do not mind tech­ni­cal doc­u­men­ta­tion, we rec­om­mend https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6265, the Request for Com­ments of the Inter­net Engi­neer­ing Task Force (IETF) called “HTTP State Man­age­ment Mechanism”.

Purpose of pro­cess­ing via cookies

The purpose ulti­mate­ly depends on the respec­tive cookie. You can find out more details below or from the soft­ware man­u­fac­tur­er that sets the cookie.

Which data are processed?

Cookies are little helpers for a wide variety of tasks. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, it is not pos­si­ble to tell which data is gen­er­al­ly stored in cookies, but in the privacy policy below we will inform you on what data is processed or stored.

Storage period of cookies

The storage period depends on the respec­tive cookie and is further spec­i­fied below. Some cookies are erased after less than an hour, while others can remain on a com­put­er for several years.

You can also influ­ence the storage dura­tion your­self. You can man­u­al­ly erase all cookies at any time in your browser (also see “Right of objec­tion” below). Fur­ther­more, the latest instance cookies based on consent will be erased is after you with­draw your consent. The legal­i­ty of storage will remain unaf­fect­ed until then.

Right of objec­tion – how can I erase cookies?

You can decide for your­self how and whether you want to use cookies. Regard­less of which service or website the cookies orig­i­nate from, you always have the option of erasing, deac­ti­vat­ing or only par­tial­ly accept­ing cookies. You can for example block third-party cookies but allow all other cookies.

If you want to find out which cookies have been stored in your browser, or if you want to change or erase cookie set­tings, you can find this option in your browser settings:

Chrome: Clear, enable and manage cookies in Chrome 

Safari: Manage cookies and website data in Safari 

Firefox: Clear cookies and site data in Firefox 

Inter­net Explor­er: Delete and manage cookies 

Microsoft Edge: Delete cookies in Microsoft Edge 

If you gen­er­al­ly do not want cookies, you can set up your browser in a way to notify you when­ev­er a cookie is about to be set. This gives you the oppor­tu­ni­ty to man­u­al­ly decide to either permit or deny the place­ment of every single cookie. This pro­ce­dure varies depend­ing on the browser. There­fore, it might be best for you to search for the instruc­tions in Google. If you are using Chrome, you could for example put the search term “delete cookies Chrome” or “deac­ti­vate cookies Chrome” into Google.

Legal basis

The so-called “cookie direc­tive” has existed since 2009. It states that the storage of cookies requires your consent (Article 6 Para­graph 1 lit. a GDPR). Within coun­tries of the EU, however, the reac­tions to these guide­lines still vary greatly. In Austria, however, this direc­tive was imple­ment­ed in Section 96 (3) of the Telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions Act (TKG). In Germany, the cookie guide­lines have not been imple­ment­ed as nation­al law. Instead, this guide­line was largely imple­ment­ed in Section 15 (3) of the Tele­me­dia Act (TMG).

For absolute­ly nec­es­sary cookies, even if no consent has been given, there are legit­i­mate inter­ests (Article 6 (1) (f) GDPR), which in most cases are of an eco­nom­ic nature. We want to offer our vis­i­tors a pleas­ant user expe­ri­ence on our website. For this, certain cookies often are absolute­ly necessary.

This is exclu­sive­ly done with your consent, unless absolute­ly nec­es­sary cookies are used. The legal basis for this is Article 6 (1) (a) of the GDPR.

In the fol­low­ing sec­tions you will find more detail on the use of cookies, pro­vid­ed the used soft­ware does use cookies.

Web hosting

Web hosting Overview

Affect­ed parties: vis­i­tors to the website
Purpose: pro­fes­sion­al hosting of the website and secu­ri­ty of operations
Processed data: IP address, time of website visit, browser used and other data. You can find more details on this below or at the respec­tive web hosting provider.
Storage period: depen­dent on the respec­tive provider, but usually 2 weeks
Legal basis: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is web hosting?

Every time you visit a website nowa­days, certain infor­ma­tion – includ­ing per­son­al data – is auto­mat­i­cal­ly created and stored, includ­ing on this website. This data should be processed as spar­ing­ly as pos­si­ble, and only with good reason. By website, we mean the entire­ty of all web­sites on your domain, i.e. every­thing from the home­page to the very last subpage (like this one here). By domain we mean example.uk or examplepage.com.

When you want to view a website on a screen, you use a program called a web browser. You prob­a­bly know the names of some web browsers: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, and Apple Safari.

The web browser has to connect to another com­put­er which stores the website’s code: the web server. Oper­at­ing a web server is com­pli­cat­ed and time-con­sum­ing, which is why this is usually done by pro­fes­sion­al providers. They offer web hosting and thus ensure the reli­able and flaw­less storage of website data.

When­ev­er the browser on your com­put­er estab­lish­es a con­nec­tion (desktop, laptop, smart­phone) and when­ev­er data is being trans­ferred to and from the web server, per­son­al data may be processed. After all, your com­put­er stores data, and the web server also has to retain the data for a period of time in order to ensure it can operate properly.

Illus­tra­tion:

Browser and Webserver

Why do we process per­son­al data?

The pur­pos­es of data pro­cess­ing are:

  1. Pro­fes­sion­al hosting of the website and oper­a­tional security
  2. To main­tain the oper­a­tional as well as IT security
  3. Anony­mous eval­u­a­tion of access pat­terns to improve our offer, and if nec­es­sary, for pros­e­cu­tion or the pursuit of claims.li>

Which data are processed?

Even while you are vis­it­ing our website, our web server, that is the com­put­er on which this website is saved, usually auto­mat­i­cal­ly saves data such as

  • the full address (URL) of the accessed website (e. g. https://www.examplepage.uk/examplesubpage.html?tid=112059870)
  • browser and browser version (e.g. Chrome 87)
  • the oper­at­ing system used (e.g. Windows 10)
  • the address (URL) of the pre­vi­ous­ly visited page (refer­rer URL) (e. g. https://www.examplepage.uk/icamefromhere.html/)
  • the host name and the IP address of the device from the website is being accessed from (e.g. COMPUTERNAME and 194.23.43.121)
  • date and time
  • in so-called web server log files

How long is the data stored?

Gen­er­al­ly, the data men­tioned above are stored for two weeks and are then auto­mat­i­cal­ly deleted. We do not pass these data on to others, but we cannot rule out the pos­si­bil­i­ty that this data may be viewed by the author­i­ties in the event of illegal conduct.

In short: Your visit is logged by our provider (company that runs our website on special com­put­ers (servers)), but we do not pass on your data without your consent!

Legal basis

The law­ful­ness of pro­cess­ing per­son­al data in the context of web hosting is jus­ti­fied in Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (safe­guard­ing of legit­i­mate inter­ests), as the use of pro­fes­sion­al hosting with a provider is nec­es­sary to present the company in a safe and user-friend­ly manner on the inter­net, as well as to have the ability to track any attacks and claims, if necessary.

Hetzner Privacy Policy

We use Hetzner for our website, which is a web hosting provider, among other things. The provider of this service is the German company Hetzner Online GmbH, Indus­triestr. 25, 91710 Gun­zen­hausen, Germany. You can find out more about the data that is processed through the use of Hetzner in their Privacy Policy at https://www.hetzner.com/de/rechtliches/datenschutz.

Web Ana­lyt­ics

Web Ana­lyt­ics Privacy Policy Overview 

Affect­ed parties: vis­i­tors to the website
Purpose: Eval­u­a­tion of visitor infor­ma­tion to opti­mise the website.
Processed data: Access sta­tis­tics that contain data such as access loca­tion, device data, access dura­tion and time, nav­i­ga­tion behav­iour, click behav­iour and IP address­es. You can find more details on this from the respec­tive web ana­lyt­ics tool directly.
Storage period: depend­ing on the respec­tive web ana­lyt­ics tool used
Legal basis: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Web Analytics?

We use soft­ware on our website, which is known as web ana­lyt­ics, in order to eval­u­ate website visitor behav­iour. Thus, data is col­lect­ed, which the ana­lyt­ic tool provider (also called track­ing tool) stores, manages and process­es. Analy­ses of user behav­iour on our website are created with this data, which we as the website oper­a­tor receive. Most tools also offer various testing options. These enable us, to for example test which offers or content our vis­i­tors prefer. For this, we may show you two dif­fer­ent offers for a limited period of time. After the test (a so-called A/B test) we know which product or content our website vis­i­tors find more inter­est­ing. For such testing as well as for various other analy­ses, user pro­files are created and the respec­tive data is stored in cookies.

Why do we run Web Analytics?

We have a clear goal in mind when it comes to our website: we want to offer our industry’s best website on the market. There­fore, we want to give you both, the best and most inter­est­ing offer as well as comfort when you visit our website. With web analy­sis tools, we can observe the behav­iour of our website vis­i­tors, and then improve our website accord­ing­ly for you and for us. For example, we can see the average age of our vis­i­tors, where they come from, the times our website gets visited the most, and which content or prod­ucts are par­tic­u­lar­ly popular. All this infor­ma­tion helps us to opti­mise our website and adapt it to your needs, inter­ests and wishes.

Which data are processed?

The exact data that is stored depends on the analy­sis tools that are being used. But gen­er­al­ly, data such as the content you view on our website are stored, as well as e. g. which buttons or links you click, when you open a page, which browser you use, which device (PC, tablet, smart­phone, etc.) you visit the website with, or which com­put­er system you use. If you have agreed that loca­tion data may also be col­lect­ed, this data may also be processed by the provider of the web analy­sis tool.

More­over, your IP address is also stored. Accord­ing to the General Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion (GDPR), IP address­es are per­son­al data. However, your IP address is usually stored in a pseu­do­nymised form (i.e. in an unrecog­nis­able and abbre­vi­at­ed form). No direct­ly link­able data such as your name, age, address or email address are stored for testing pur­pos­es, web analy­ses and web opti­mi­sa­tions. If this data is col­lect­ed, it is retained in a pseu­do­nymised form. There­fore, it cannot be used to iden­ti­fy you as a person.

The storage period of the respec­tive data always depends on the provider. Some cookies only retain data for a few minutes or until you leave the website, while other cookies can store data for several years.

Dura­tion of data processing

If we have any further infor­ma­tion on the dura­tion of data pro­cess­ing, you will find it below. We gen­er­al­ly only process per­son­al data for as long as is absolute­ly nec­es­sary to provide prod­ucts and ser­vices. The storage period may be extend­ed if it is required by law, such as for account­ing pur­pos­es for example for accounting.

Right to object

You also have the option and the right to revoke your consent to the use of cookies or third-party providers at any time. This works either via our cookie man­age­ment tool or via other opt-out func­tions. For example, you can also prevent data pro­cess­ing by cookies by man­ag­ing, deac­ti­vat­ing or erasing cookies in your browser.

Legal basis

The use of Web Ana­lyt­ics requires your consent, which we obtained with our cookie popup. Accord­ing to Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a of the GDPR (consent), this consent rep­re­sents the legal basis for the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data, such as by col­lec­tion through Web Ana­lyt­ics tools.

In addi­tion to consent, we have a legit­i­mate inter­est in analysing the behav­iour of website vis­i­tors, which enables us to tech­ni­cal­ly and eco­nom­i­cal­ly improve our offer. With Web Ana­lyt­ics, we can recog­nise website errors, iden­ti­fy attacks and improve prof­itabil­i­ty. The legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f of the GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests). Nev­er­the­less, we only use these tools if you have given your consent.

Since Web Ana­lyt­ics tools use cookies, we rec­om­mend you to read our privacy policy on cookies. If you want to find out which of your data are stored and processed, you should read the privacy poli­cies of the respec­tive tools.

If avail­able, infor­ma­tion on special Web Ana­lyt­ics tools can be found in the fol­low­ing sections.

Google Ana­lyt­ics Privacy Policy

Google Ana­lyt­ics Privacy Policy Overview 

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: Eval­u­a­tion of visitor infor­ma­tion to opti­mise the website.
Processed data: Access sta­tis­tics that contain data such as the loca­tion of access, device data, access dura­tion and time, nav­i­ga­tion behav­iour, click behav­iour and IP address­es. You can find more details on this in the privacy policy below.
Storage period: depend­ing on the prop­er­ties used
Legal basis: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Google Analytics?

We use the track­ing and analy­sis tool Google Ana­lyt­ics (GA) of the US-Amer­i­can company Google LLC (1600 Amphithe­atre Parkway Moun­tain View, CA 94043, USA). Google Ana­lyt­ics col­lects data on your actions on our website. When­ev­er you click a link for example, this action is saved in a cookie and trans­ferred to Google Ana­lyt­ics. With the help of reports which we receive from Google Ana­lyt­ics, we can adapt our website and our ser­vices better to your wishes. In the fol­low­ing, we will explain the track­ing tool in more detail, and most of all, we will inform you what data is saved and how you can prevent this.

Google Ana­lyt­ics is a track­ing tool with the purpose of con­duct­ing data traffic analy­sis of our website. For Google Ana­lyt­ics to work, there is a track­ing code inte­grat­ed to our website. Upon your visit to our website, this code records various actions you perform on your website. As soon as you leave our website, this data is sent to the Google Ana­lyt­ics server, where it is stored.

Google process­es this data and we then receive reports on your user behav­iour. These reports can be one of the following:

  • Target audi­ence reports: With the help of target audi­ence reports we can get to know our users better and can there­fore better under­stand who is inter­est­ed in our service.
  • Adver­tis­ing reports: Through adver­tis­ing reports we can analyse our online adver­tis­ing better and hence improve it.
  • Acqui­si­tion reports: Acqui­si­tion reports provide us helpful infor­ma­tion on how we can get more people enthu­si­as­tic about our service.
  • Behav­iour reports: With these reports, we can find out how you inter­act with our website. By the means of behav­iour reports, we can under­stand what path you go on our website and what links you click.
  • Con­ver­sion reports: A con­ver­sion is the process of leading you to carry out a desired action due to a mar­ket­ing message. An example of this would be trans­form­ing you from a mere website visitor into a buyer or a newslet­ter sub­scriber. Hence, with the help of these reports we can see in more detail, if our mar­ket­ing mea­sures are suc­cess­ful with you. Our aim is to increase our con­ver­sion rate.
  • Real time reports: With the help of these reports we can see in real time, what happens on our website. It makes us for example see, we can see how many users are reading this text right now.

Why do we use Google Ana­lyt­ics on our website?

The objec­tive of our website is clear: We want to offer you the best pos­si­ble service. Google Ana­lyt­ics’ sta­tis­tics and data help us with reach­ing this goal.

Sta­tis­ti­cal­ly eval­u­at­ed data give us a clear picture of the strengths and weak­ness­es of our website. On the one hand, we can opti­mise our page in a way, that makes it easier to be found by inter­est­ed people on Google. On the other hand, the data helps us to get a better under­stand­ing of you as our visitor. There­fore, we can very accu­rate­ly find out what we must improve on our website, in order to offer you the best pos­si­ble service. The analy­sis of that data also enables us to carry out our adver­tis­ing and mar­ket­ing mea­sures in a more indi­vid­ual and more cost-effec­tive way. After all, it only makes sense to show our prod­ucts and ser­vices exclu­sive­ly to people who are inter­est­ed in them.

What data is stored by Google Analytics?

With the aid of a track­ing code, Google Ana­lyt­ics creates a random, unique ID which is con­nect­ed to your browser cookie. That way, Google Ana­lyt­ics recog­nis­es you as a new user. The next time you visit our site, you will be recog­nised as a “recur­ring” user. All data that is col­lect­ed gets saved togeth­er with this very user ID. Only this is how it is made pos­si­ble for us to eval­u­ate and analyse pseu­do­ny­mous user profiles.

To analyse our website with Google Ana­lyt­ics, a prop­er­ty ID must be insert­ed into the track­ing code. The data is then stored in the cor­re­spond­ing prop­er­ty. Google Ana­lyt­ics 4‑property is stan­dard for every newly created prop­er­ty. An alter­na­tive however, is the Uni­ver­sal Ana­lyt­ics Prop­er­ty. Depend­ing on the prop­er­ty that is being used, data are stored for dif­fer­ent periods of time.

Your inter­ac­tions on our website are mea­sured by tags such as cookies and app instance IDs. Inter­ac­tions are all kinds of actions that you perform on our website. If you are also using other Google systems (such as a Google Account), data gen­er­at­ed by Google Ana­lyt­ics can be linked with third-party cookies. Google does not pass on any Google Ana­lyt­ics data, unless we as the website owners autho­rise it. In case it is required by law, excep­tions can occur.

The fol­low­ing cookies are used by Google Analytics:

Name: _ga
Value:2.1326744211.152112059870–5
Purpose: By deaf­ault, analytics.js uses the cookie _ga, to save the user ID. It gen­er­al­ly serves the purpose of dif­fer­en­ti­at­ing between website visitors.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 2 years

Name: _gid
Value:2.1687193234.152112059870–1
Purpose: This cookie also serves the purpose of dif­fer­en­ti­at­ing between website users
Expi­ra­tion date: After 24 hours

Name: _gat_gtag_UA_<property-id>
Value: 1
Ver­wen­dungszweck: It is used for decreas­ing the demand rate. If Google Ana­lyt­ics is pro­vid­ed via Google Tag Manager, this cookie gets the name _dc_gtm_ <prop­er­ty-id>.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 1 minute

Name: AMP_TOKEN
Value: No information
Purpose: This cookie has a token which is used to retrieve the user ID by the AMP Client ID Service. Other pos­si­ble values suggest a logoff, a request or an error.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 30 seconds up to one year

Name: __utma
Value:1564498958.1564498958.1564498958.1
Purpose: With this cookie your behav­iour on the website can be tracked and the site per­for­mance can be mea­sured. The cookie is updated every time the infor­ma­tion is sent to Google Analytics.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 2 years

Name: __utmt
Value: 1
Purpose: Just like _gat_gtag_UA_<property-id> this cookie is used for keeping the require­ment rate in check.
Expi­ra­tion date: Afer 10 minutes

Name: __utmb
Value:3.10.1564498958
Purpose: This cookie is used to deter­mine new ses­sions. It is updated every time new data or infor­ma­tion gets sent to Google Analytics.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 30 minutes

Name: __utmc
Value: 167421564
Purpose: This cookie is used to deter­mine new ses­sions for recur­ring vis­i­tors. It is there­fore a session cookie, and only stays stored until you close the browser again.
Expi­ra­tion date: After closing the browser

Name: __utmz
Value: m|utmccn=(referral)|utmcmd=referral|utmcct=/
Purpose: This cookie is used to iden­ti­fy the source of the number of vis­i­tors to our website. This means, that the cookie stored infor­ma­tion on where you came to our website from. This could be another site or an advertisement.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 6 months

Name: __utmv
Value: No information
Purpose: The cookie is used to store custom user data. It gets updated when­ev­er infor­ma­tion is sent to Google Analytics.
Expi­ra­tion date: After 2 years

Note: This list is by no means exhaus­tive, since Google are repeat­ed­ly chang­ing the use of their cookies.

Below we will give you an overview of the most impor­tant data that can be eval­u­at­ed by Google Analytics:

Heatmaps: Google creates so-called Heatmaps an. These Heatmaps make it pos­si­ble to see the exact areas you click on, so we can get infor­ma­tion on what routes you make on our website.

Session dura­tion: Google calls the time you spend on our website without leaving it session dura­tion. When­ev­er you are inac­tive for 20 minutes, the session ends automatically.

Bounce rate If you only look at one page of our website and then leave our website again, it is called a bounce.

Account cre­ation: If you create an account or make an order on our website, Google Ana­lyt­ics col­lects this data.

IP-Address: The IP address is only shown in a short­ened form, to make it impos­si­ble to clearly allo­cate it.

Loca­tion: Your approx­i­mate loca­tion and the country you are in can be defined by the IP address. This process is called IP loca­tion determination.

Tech­ni­cal infor­ma­tion: Infor­ma­tion about your browser type, your inter­net provider and your screen res­o­lu­tion are called tech­ni­cal information.

Source: Both, Google Ana­lyt­ics as well as our­selves, are inter­est­ed what website or what adver­tise­ment led you to our site.

Further pos­si­bly stored data include contact data, poten­tial reviews, playing media (e.g. when you play a video on our site), sharing of con­tents via social media or adding our site to your favourites. This list is not exhaus­tive and only serves as general guid­ance on Google Ana­lyt­ics’ data retention.

How long and where is the data stored?

Google has servers across the globe. Most of them are in America and there­fore your data is mainly saved on Amer­i­can servers. Here you can read detailed infor­ma­tion on where Google’s data centres are located: https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=en

Your data is allo­cat­ed to various phys­i­cal data mediums. This has the advan­tage of allow­ing to retrieve the data faster, and of pro­tect­ing it better from manip­u­la­tion. Every Google data centre has respec­tive emer­gency pro­grams for your data. Hence, in case of a hard­ware failure at Google or a server error due to natural dis­as­ters, the risk for a service inter­rup­tion stays rel­a­tive­ly low.

The data reten­tion period depends on the prop­er­ties used. When using the newer Google Ana­lyt­ics 4‑properties, the reten­tion period of your user data is set to 14 months. For so-called event data, we have the option of choos­ing a reten­tion period of either 2 months or 14 months.

Google Ana­lyt­ics has a 26 months stan­dard­ised period of retain­ing your user data. After this time, your user data is deleted. However, we have the pos­si­bil­i­ty to choose the reten­tion period of user data our­selves. There are the fol­low­ing five options:

  • Dele­tion after 14 months
  • Dele­tion after 26 months
  • Dele­tion after 38 months
  • Dele­tion after 50 months
  • No auto­mat­i­cal deletion

Addi­tion­al­ly, there is the option for data to be deleted only if you no longer visit our website within a period deter­mined by us. In this case, the reten­tion period will be reset every time you revisit our website within the spec­i­fied period.

As soon as the chosen period is expired, the data is deleted once a month. This reten­tion period applies to any of your data which is linked to cookies, user iden­ti­fi­ca­tion and adver­tise­ment IDs (e.g. cookies of the Dou­bleClick domain). Any report results are based on aggre­gat­ed infor­ma­tion and are stored inde­pen­dent­ly of any user data. Aggre­gat­ed infor­ma­tion is a merge of indi­vid­ual data into a single and bigger unit.

How can I delete my data or prevent data retention?

Under the pro­vi­sions of the Euro­pean Union’s data pro­tec­tion law, you have the right to obtain infor­ma­tion on your data and to update, delete or restrict it. With the help of a browser add on that can deac­ti­vate Google Ana­lyt­ics’ JavaScript (ga.js, analytics.js, dc.js), you can prevent Google Ana­lyt­ics from using your data. You can down­load this add on at https://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout?hl=en-GB. Please con­sid­er that this add on can only deac­ti­vate any data col­lec­tion by Google Analytics.

If you gen­er­al­ly want to deac­ti­vate, delete or manage all cookies (inde­pen­dent­ly of Google Ana­lyt­ics), you can use one of the guides that are avail­able for any browser:

Chrome: Clear, enable and manage cookies in Chrome 

Safari: Manage cookies and website data in Safari 

Firefox: Clear cookies and site data in Firefox 

Inter­net Explor­er: Delete and manage cookies 

Microsoft Edge: Delete cookies in Microsoft Edge 

Legal basis

The use of Google Ana­lyt­ics requires your consent, which we obtained via our cookie popup. Accord­ing to Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a of the GDPR (consent) , this is the legal basis for the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data when col­lect­ed via web ana­lyt­ics tools.

In addi­tion to consent, we have legit­i­mate inter­est in analysing the behav­iour of website vis­i­tors, in order to tech­ni­cal­ly and eco­nom­i­cal­ly improve our offer. With Google Ana­lyt­ics, we can recog­nise website errors, iden­ti­fy attacks and improve prof­itabil­i­ty. The legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f of the GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests) . Nev­er­the­less, we only use Google Ana­lyt­ics if you have given your consent.

Google also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Google uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Google to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

We hope we could provide you with the most impor­tant infor­ma­tion about data pro­cess­ing by Google Ana­lyt­ics. If you want to find out more on the track­ing service, we rec­om­mend these two links: https://marketingplatform.google.com/about/analytics/terms/gb/ and https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/6004245?hl=en.

Google Ana­lyt­ics in Consent Mode

Depend­ing on your consent, Google Ana­lyt­ics will progress your per­son­al data in the so-called “consent mode”. You can choose whether or not you want to accept Google Ana­lyt­ics cookies, and thus which of your data Google Ana­lyt­ics may process. The retained data is mainly used to measure user behav­iour on the website, to serve tar­get­ed adver­tis­ing and to provide us with web analy­sis reports. Usually, you would consent to Google’s data pro­cess­ing via a cookie consent tool. If you do not consent to data pro­cess­ing, only aggre­gat­ed data will be col­lect­ed and processed. This means that data cannot be assigned to indi­vid­ual users and there­fore no user profile will be created for you. You also have the option to only agree to sta­tis­ti­cal mea­sure­ment, meaning that none of your per­son­al data will be processed and used for adver­tis­ing or adver­tis­ing mea­sure­ment sequences.

Google Ana­lyt­ics IP Anonymisation

We imple­ment­ed Google Ana­lyt­ics’ IP address anonymi­sa­tion to this website. Google devel­oped this func­tion, so this website can comply with the applic­a­ble privacy laws and the local data pro­tec­tion author­i­ties’ rec­om­men­da­tions, should they pro­hib­it the reten­tion of any full IP addresses.
The anonymi­sa­tion or masking of IP address­es takes place, as soon as they reach Google Ana­lyt­ics’ data col­lec­tion network, but before the data would be saved or processed.

You can find more infor­ma­tion on IP anonymi­sa­tion at https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2763052?hl=en.

Google Tag Manager Privacy Policy

Google Tag Manager Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: Organ­i­sa­tion of indi­vid­ual track­ing tools
Processed data: Google Tag Manager itself does not store any data. The data record tags of the web ana­lyt­ics tools used.
Storage period: depend­ing on the web ana­lyt­ics tool used
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Google Tag Manager?

We use Google Tag Manager by the company Google Inc. (1600 Amphithe­atre Parkway Moun­tain View, CA 94043, USA) for our website.
This Tag Manager is one of Google’s many helpful mar­ket­ing prod­ucts. With it, we can cen­tral­ly inte­grate and manage code sec­tions of various track­ing tools, that we use on our website.

In this privacy state­ment we will explain in more detail, what Google Tag Manager does, why we use it and to what extent your data is processed.

Google Tag Manager is an organ­is­ing tool with which we can inte­grate and manage website tags cen­tral­ly and via a user inter­face. Tags are little code sec­tions which e.g. track your activ­i­ties on our website. For this, seg­ments of JavaScript code are inte­grat­ed to our site’s source text. The tags often come from Google’s intern prod­ucts, such as Google Ads or Google Ana­lyt­ics, but tags from other com­pa­nies can also be inte­grat­ed and managed via the manager. Since the tags have dif­fer­ent tasks, they can collect browser data, feed mar­ket­ing tools with data, embed buttons, set cookies and track users across several websites.

Why do we use Google Tag Manager for our website?

Every­body knows: Being organ­ised is impor­tant! Of course, this also applies to main­te­nance of our website. In order to organ­ise and design our website as well as pos­si­ble for you and anyone who is inter­est­ed in our prod­ucts and ser­vices, we rely on various track­ing tools, such as Google Analytics.
The col­lect­ed data shows us what inter­ests you most, which of our ser­vices we should improve, and which other persons we should also display our ser­vices to. Fur­ther­more, for this track­ing to work, we must imple­ment rel­e­vant JavaScript Codes to our website. While we could the­o­ret­i­cal­ly inte­grate every code section of every track­ing tool sep­a­rate­ly into our source text, this would take too much time and we would lose overview. This is the reason why we use Google Tag Manager. We can easily inte­grate the nec­es­sary scripts and manage them from one place. Addi­tion­al­ly, Google Tag Manager’s user inter­face is easy to operate, and requires no pro­gram­ming skills. There­fore, we can easily keep order in our jungle of tags.

What data is stored by Google Tag Manager?

Tag Manager itself is a domain that neither uses cookies nor stores data. It merely func­tions as an “admin­is­tra­tor“ of imple­ment­ed tags. Data is col­lect­ed by the indi­vid­ual tags of the dif­fer­ent web analy­sis tools. There­fore, in Google Tag Manager the data is sent to the indi­vid­ual track­ing tools and does not get saved.

However, with the inte­grat­ed tags of dif­fer­ent web analy­sis tools such as Google Ana­lyt­ics, this is quite dif­fer­ent. Depend­ing on the analy­sis tool used, various data on your inter­net behav­iour is col­lect­ed, stored and processed with the help of cookies. Please read our texts on data pro­tec­tion for more infor­ma­tion on the artic­u­lar analy­sis and track­ing tools we use on our website.

We allowed Google via the account set­tings for the Tag Manager to receive anonymised data from us. However, this exclu­sive­ly refers to the use of our Tag Manager and not to your data, which are saved via code sec­tions. We allow Google and others, to receive select­ed data in anony­mous form. There­fore, we agree to the anonymised trans­fer of our website data. However, even after exten­sive research we could not find out what sum­marised and anony­mous data it is exactly that gets trans­mit­ted. What we do know is that Google deleted any info that could iden­ti­fy our website. Google com­bines the data with hun­dreds of other anony­mous website data and creates user trends as part of bench­mark­ing mea­sures. Bench­mark­ing is a process of com­par­ing a company’s results with the ones of com­peti­tors. As a result, process­es can be opti­mised based on the col­lect­ed information.

How long and where is the data stored?

When Google stores data, this is done on Google’s own servers. These servers are located all over the world, with most of them being in America. At https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=en you can read in detail where Google’s servers are.

In our indi­vid­ual data pro­tec­tion texts on the dif­fer­ent tools you can find out how long the respec­tive track­ing tools store your data.

How can I delete my data or prevent data retention?

Google Tag Manager itself does not set any cookies but manages dif­fer­ent track­ing web­sites’ tags. In our data pro­tec­tion texts on the dif­fer­ent track­ing tools you can find detailed infor­ma­tion on how you can delete or manage your data.

Please note that when using this tool, your data may also be stored and processed outside the EU. Most third coun­tries (includ­ing the USA) are not con­sid­ered secure under current Euro­pean data pro­tec­tion law. Data must not be trans­ferred, stored and processed to inse­cure third coun­tries, unless there are suit­able guar­an­tees (such as EU stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses) between us and the non-Euro­pean service provider.

Legal basis

The use of the Google Tag Manager requires your consent, which we obtained via our cookie popup. Accord­ing to Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), this consent is the legal basis for per­son­al data pro­cess­ing, such as when it is col­lect­ed by web ana­lyt­ics tools.

In addi­tion to consent, we have a legit­i­mate inter­est in analysing the behav­iour of website vis­i­tors and thus tech­ni­cal­ly and eco­nom­i­cal­ly improv­ing our offer. With the help of Google Tag Man­agers we can also improve prof­itabil­i­ty. The legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests). We only use Google Tag Manager if you have given us your consent.

Google also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Google uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Google to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

If you want to learn more about Google Tag Manager, we rec­om­mend their FAQs at https://support.google.com/tagmanager/?hl=en#topic=3441530.

Audio & Video

Audio & Video Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: service optimisation
Processed data: Data such as contact details, user behav­iour, device infor­ma­tion and IP address­es can be stored.
You can find more details in the Privacy Policy below.
Storage period: data are retained for as long as nec­es­sary for the pro­vi­sion of the service
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What are audio and video elements?

We have inte­grat­ed audio and video ele­ments to our website. There­fore, you can watch videos or listen to music/podcasts direct­ly via our website. This content is deliv­ered by service providers and is obtained from the respec­tive providers’ servers.

Audio and video ele­ments are inte­grat­ed func­tion­al ele­ments of plat­forms such as YouTube, Vimeo or Spotify. It is usually free of charge to use these portals, but they can also contain paid content. With the inte­grat­ed ele­ments, you can listen to or view any of their content on our website.

If you use audio or video ele­ments on our website, your per­son­al data may get trans­mit­ted to as well as processed and retained by service providers.

Why do we use audio & video ele­ments on our website?

We of course want to provide you with the best offer on our website. And we are aware that content is no longer just con­veyed in text and static images. Instead of just giving you a link to a video, we offer you audio and video formats direct­ly on our website. These are enter­tain­ing or infor­ma­tive, but ideally they are both. Our service there­fore gets expand­ed and it gets easier for you to access inter­est­ing content. In addi­tion to our texts and images, we thus also offer video and/or audio content.

Which data are retained by audio & video elements?

When you visit a page on our website with e.g. an embed­ded video, your server con­nects to the service provider’s server. Thus, your data will also be trans­ferred to the third-party provider, where it will be stored. Certain data is col­lect­ed and stored regard­less of whether you have an account with the third party provider or not. This usually includes your IP address, browser type, oper­at­ing system and other general infor­ma­tion about your device. Most providers also collect infor­ma­tion on your web activ­i­ty. This e.g. includes the session dura­tion, bounce rate, the buttons you clicked or infor­ma­tion about the website you are using the service on. This data is mostly stored via cookies or pixel tags (also known as web beacons). Any data that is pseu­do­nymised usually gets stored in your browser via cookies. In the respec­tive provider’s Privacy Policy, you can always find more infor­ma­tion on the data that is stored and processed.

Dura­tion of data processing

You can find out exactly how long the data is stored on the third-party provider’s servers either in a lower point of the respec­tive tool’s Privacy Policy or in the provider’s Privacy Policy. Gen­er­al­ly, per­son­al data is only processed for as long as is absolute­ly nec­es­sary for the pro­vi­sion of our ser­vices or prod­ucts. This usually also applies to third-party providers. In most cases, you can assume that certain data will be stored on third-party providers’ servers for several years. Data can be retained for dif­fer­ent amounts of time, espe­cial­ly when stored in cookies. Some cookies are deleted after you leave a website, while others may be stored in your browser for a few years.

Right to object

You also retain the right and the option to revoke your consent to the use of cookies or third-party providers at any time. This can be done either via our cookie man­age­ment tool or via other opt-out func­tions. You can e.g. also prevent data reten­tion via cookies by man­ag­ing, deac­ti­vat­ing or erasing cookies in your browser. The legal­i­ty of the pro­cess­ing up to the point of revo­ca­tion remains unaffected.

Since the inte­grat­ed audio and video func­tions on our site usually also use cookies, we rec­om­mend you to also read our general Privacy Policy on cookies. You can find out more about the han­dling and storage of your data in the Privacy Poli­cies of the respec­tive third party providers.

Legal basis 

If you have con­sent­ed to the pro­cess­ing and storage of your data by inte­grat­ed audio and video ele­ments, your consent is con­sid­ered the legal basis for data pro­cess­ing (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. a GDPR). Gen­er­al­ly, your data is also stored and processed on the basis of our legit­i­mate inter­est (Art. 6 Para. 1 lit. f GDPR) in main­tain­ing fast and good com­mu­ni­ca­tion with you or other cus­tomers and busi­ness part­ners. We only use the inte­grat­ed audio and video ele­ments if you have con­sent­ed to it.

Vimeo Privacy Policy

Vimeo Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: opti­mis­ing our service
Processed data: Data such as contact details, data on user behav­iour, infor­ma­tion about your device and IP address may be stored.
You can find more details on this in privacy policy below.
Storage period: data are gen­er­al­ly stored for as long as is nec­es­sary for the purpose of the service
Legal basis: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Vimeo?

On our website, we use videos of the company Vimeo. This video portal is oper­at­ed by Vimeo LLC, 555 West 18th Street, New York, New York 10011, USA. With the help of a plug-in, we can display inter­est­ing video mate­r­i­al direct­ly on our website. Con­se­quent­ly, some of your data may be trans­mit­ted to Vimeo. In this privacy policy we want to explain to you what data this is, why we use Vimeo and how you can manage your data or prevent data transmission.

Vimeo is a video plat­form that was founded in 2004 and intro­duced video stream­ing in HD quality in 2007. Since 2015 it has been pos­si­ble to stream in 4k Ultra HD. The use of the portal is free of charge, but it also con­tains certain paid content. Com­pared to the market leader YouTube, Vimeo attach­es great impor­tance to valu­able content in good quality. On the one hand, the portal offers a lot of artis­tic content such as music videos and short films. On the other hand, it also offers useful doc­u­men­taries on a broad spec­trum of topics.

Why do we use Vimeo on our website?

The aim of our website is to provide you the best pos­si­ble content, in the easiest and most acces­si­ble way we can. We will only be sat­is­fied with our service, once we have reached that goal. The video service Vimeo sup­ports us in achiev­ing this goal. Vimeo gives us the oppor­tu­ni­ty to present high quality content to you direct­ly on our website. Instead of us merely giving you a link to an inter­est­ing video, you can watch the video here with us. This extends our service and makes it easier for you to access inter­est­ing content. There­fore, in addi­tion to our texts and images, we can also offer video content.

What data is stored on Vimeo?

When you open a site on our website that has a Vimeo video embed­ded to it, your browser will connect to Vimeo’s servers, and a data trans­mis­sion will take place. The data are then col­lect­ed, stored and processed on Vimeo’s servers. Regard­less of whether you have a Vimeo account or not, Vimeo col­lects data about you. This includes your IP address, tech­ni­cal infor­ma­tion about your browser type, your oper­at­ing system or very basic device infor­ma­tion. Fur­ther­more, Vimeo store infor­ma­tion on what website you use their service on and which actions (web activ­i­ties) you carry out on our website. These web activ­i­ties include e.g. session dura­tion, bounce rate or which button you clicked on our site that con­tains a Vimeo func­tion. Vimeo can track and store these actions using cookies and similar technologies.

If you are logged in as a reg­is­tered member of Vimeo, more data may be col­lect­ed, since a bigger number of cookies may already have been set in your browser. Fur­ther­more, your actions on our website are direct­ly linked to your Vimeo account. To prevent this, you must log out of Vimeo while “surfing” our website.

Below we will show you an array of cookies Vimeo sets when you are on a website con­tain­ing an inte­grat­ed Vimeo func­tion. This list is not exhaus­tive and assumes that you do not have a Vimeo account.

Name: player
Value: “”
Purpose: This cookie saves your set­tings before you play an embed­ded Vimeo video. This will ensure you to receive your pre­ferred set­tings again next time you watch a Vimeo video.
Expiry date: after one year

Name: vuid
Value: pl1046149876.614422590112059870–4

Purpose: 
This cookie col­lects infor­ma­tion about your actions on web­sites that have a Vimeo video embed­ded to them.

Expiry date: 
after 2 years

Note: These two cookies are set every time as soon as you are on a website that has a Vimeo video embed­ded to it. If you watch the video and click a button such as “share” or “like”, addi­tion­al cookies will be set. These can also be third-party cookies such as _ga or _gat_UA-76641–8 from Google Ana­lyt­ics or _fbp from Face­book. The exact cookies that are set depends on your inter­ac­tion with the video.

The fol­low­ing list will show a selec­tion of cookies that could be placed when you inter­act with a Vimeo video:

Name: _abexps
Value: %5B%5D

Purpose: This Vimeo cookie helps Vimeo to remem­ber your set­tings. For example, this can be a pre-set lan­guage, a region or a user­name. The cookie gen­er­al­ly stores data on how you use Vimeo.

Expiry date: after one year

Name: continuous_play_v3
Value: 1
Purpose: This cookie is a first-party cookie from Vimeo. The cookie col­lects infor­ma­tion on how you use Vimeo’s service. For example, the cookie stores details on when you pause a video and resume it.
Expiry date: after one year

Name: _ga
Value: GA1.2.1522249635.1578401280112059870–7
Purpose: This cookie is a third-party cookie from Google. By default, analytics.js uses the _ga cookie to store the user ID. Thus, it serves to dif­fer­en­ti­ate between website visitors.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: _gcl_au
Value: 1.1.770887836.1578401279112059870–3
Purpose: This third-party cookie from Google AdSense is used to improve the effi­cien­cy of ads on websites.
Expiry date: after 3 months

Name: _fbp
Value: fb.1.1578401280585.310434968
Purpose:This is a Face­book cookie. It is used to display adverts or adver­tis­ing prod­ucts from Face­book or other advertisers.
Expiry date: after 3 months

Vimeo use this data to improve their own service, to com­mu­ni­cate with you and to imple­ment their own tar­get­ed adver­tis­ing mea­sures. On their website they empha­sise that only first-party cookies (i.e. cookies from Vimeo itself) are used for embed­ded videos, pro­vid­ed you do not inter­act with the video.

How long and where is the data stored?

Vimeo is head­quar­tered in White Plains, New York (USA). However, their ser­vices are offered world­wide. For this, the company uses com­put­er systems, data­bas­es and servers in the United States and other coun­tries. Thus, your data may also be stored and processed on servers in America. Vimeo stores the data until the company no longer has an eco­nom­i­cal reason for keeping it. Then the data will be deleted or anonymised. Vimeo cor­re­spond to the EU‑U.S. Privacy Shield Frame­work and are there­fore allowed to collect and use infor­ma­tion from users within the EU, and to trans­fer this data to the USA.

How can I erase my data or prevent data retention?

You always have the option to manage cookies in your browser. If you do not want Vimeo to set cookies and collect infor­ma­tion about you for example, you can delete or deac­ti­vate cookies in your browser set­tings at any time. These set­tings vary a little depend­ing on the browser. Please note that after deactivating/deleting cookies, various func­tions may no longer be fully avail­able. The fol­low­ing instruc­tions show how you can manage or delete cookies in your browser.

Chrome: Clear, enable and manage cookies in Chrome 

Safari: Manage cookies and website data in Safari 

Firefox: Clear cookies and site data in Firefox 

Inter­net Explor­er: Delete and manage cookies 

Microsoft Edge: Delete cookies in Microsoft Edge 

If you are a reg­is­tered Vimeo member, you can also manage cookies in Vimeo’s settings.

Legal basis

If you have con­sent­ed to the pro­cess­ing and storage of your data by inte­grat­ed Vimeo ele­ments, this consent is the legal basis for data pro­cess­ing (Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR) . Gen­er­al­ly, your data is also stored and processed on the basis of our legit­i­mate inter­est (Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR) to main­tain fast and good com­mu­ni­ca­tion with you or other cus­tomers and busi­ness part­ners. Nev­er­the­less, we only use inte­grat­ed Vimeo ele­ments if you have given your consent. Vimeo also sets cookies in your browser to store data. We there­fore rec­om­mend you to read our privacy policy on cookies care­ful­ly and to take a look at the privacy policy or the cookie policy of the respec­tive service provider.

Vimeo also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Vimeo uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway, and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Vimeo to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

You can find out more about the use of cookies at Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/cookie_policy. Fur­ther­more, you can find more infor­ma­tion on privacy at Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/privacy.

YouTube Privacy Policy

YouTube Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: opti­mis­ing our service
Processed data: Data such as contact details, data on user behav­iour, infor­ma­tion about your device and IP address may be stored.
You can find more details on this in the privacy policy below.
Storage period: data are gen­er­al­ly stored for as long as is nec­es­sary for the purpose of the service
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is YouTube?

We have inte­grat­ed YouTube videos to our website. There­fore, we can show you inter­est­ing videos direct­ly on our site. YouTube is a video portal, which has been a sub­sidiary company of Google LLC since 2006. The video portal is oper­at­ed by YouTube, LLC, 901 Cherry Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066, USA. When you visit a page on our website that con­tains an embed­ded YouTube video, your browser auto­mat­i­cal­ly con­nects to the servers of YouTube or Google. Thereby, certain data are trans­ferred (depend­ing on the set­tings). Google is respon­si­ble for YouTube’s data pro­cess­ing and there­fore Google’s data pro­tec­tion applies.

In the fol­low­ing we will explain in more detail which data is processed, why we have inte­grat­ed YouTube videos and how you can manage or clear your data.

On YouTube, users can watch, rate, comment or upload videos for free. Over the past few years, YouTube has become one of the most impor­tant social media chan­nels world­wide. For us to be able to display videos on our website, YouTube pro­vides a code snippet that we have inte­grat­ed to our website.

Why do we use YouTube videos on our website?

YouTube is the video plat­form with the most vis­i­tors and best content. We strive to offer you the best pos­si­ble user expe­ri­ence on our website, which of course includes inter­est­ing videos. With the help of our embed­ded videos, we can provide you other helpful content in addi­tion to our texts and images. Addi­tion­al­ly, embed­ded videos make it easier for our website to be found on the Google search engine. More­over, if we place ads via Google Ads, Google only shows these ads to people who are inter­est­ed in our offers, thanks to the col­lect­ed data.

What data is stored by YouTube?

As soon as you visit one of our pages with an inte­grat­ed YouTube, YouTube places at least one cookie that stores your IP address and our URL. If you are logged into your YouTube account, by using cookies YouTube can usually asso­ciate your inter­ac­tions on our website with your profile. This includes data such as session dura­tion, bounce rate, approx­i­mate loca­tion, tech­ni­cal infor­ma­tion such as browser type, screen res­o­lu­tion or your Inter­net provider. Addi­tion­al data can include contact details, poten­tial ratings, shared content via social media or YouTube videos you added to your favourites.

If you are not logged in to a Google or YouTube account, Google stores data with a unique iden­ti­fi­er linked to your device, browser or app. Thereby, e.g. your pre­ferred lan­guage setting is main­tained. However, many inter­ac­tion data cannot be saved since less cookies are set.

In the fol­low­ing list we show you cookies that were placed in the browser during a test. On the one hand, we show cookies that were set without being logged into a YouTube account. On the other hand, we show you what cookies were placed while being logged in. We do not claim for this list to be exhaus­tive, as user data always depend on how you inter­act with YouTube.

Name: YSC
Value: b9-CV6o­jI5Y112059870‑1
Purpose: This cookie reg­is­ters a unique ID to store sta­tis­tics of the video that was viewed.
Expiry date: after end of session

Name: PREF
Value: f1=50000000
Purpose: This cookie also reg­is­ters your unique ID. Google receives sta­tis­tics via PREF on how you use YouTube videos on our website.
Expiry date: after 8 months

Name: GPS
Value: 1
Purpose: This cookie reg­is­ters your unique ID on mobile devices to track GPS locations.
Expiry date: after 30 minutes

Name: VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE
Value: 95Chz8bagyU
Purpose: This cookie tries to esti­mate the user’s inter­net band­with on our sites (that have built-in YouTube videos).
Expiry date: after 8 months

Further cookies that are placed when you are logged into your YouTube account:

Name: APISID
Value: zIL­lv­ClZSkqGsS­wI/AU1aZ­I6HY7112059870-
Purpose: This cookie is used to create a profile on your inter­ests. This data is then used for per­son­alised advertisements.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: CONSENT
Value: YES+AT.de+20150628–20‑0
Purpose: The cookie stores the status of a user’s consent to the use of various Google ser­vices. CONSENT also pro­vides safety mea­sures to protect users from unau­tho­rised attacks.
Expiry date: after 19 years

Name: HSID
Value: AcRwpgUik9Dveht0I
Purpose: This cookie is used to create a profile on your inter­ests. This data helps to display cus­tomised ads.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: LOGIN_INFO
Value: AFmmF2swRQIhALl6aL…
Purpose: This cookie stores infor­ma­tion on your login data.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SAPISID
Value: 7oaPxoG-pZsJu­uF5/AnUd­DUIsJ9i­Jz2vdM
Purpose: This cookie iden­ti­fies your browser and device. It is used to create a profile on your interests.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SID
Value: oQfNKjAsI112059870-
Purpose: This cookie stores your Google Account ID and your last login time, in a dig­i­tal­ly signed and encrypt­ed form.
Expiry date: after 2 years

Name: SIDCC
Value: AN0-TYuqub2JOcDTyL
Purpose: This cookie stores infor­ma­tion on how you use the website and on what adver­tise­ments you may have seen before vis­it­ing our website.
Expiry date: after 3 months

How long and where is the data stored?

The data YouTube receive and process on you are stored on Google’s servers. Most of these servers are in America. At https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=en you can see where Google’s data centres are located. Your data is dis­trib­uted across the servers. There­fore, the data can be retrieved quicker and is better pro­tect­ed against manipulation.

Google stores col­lect­ed data for dif­fer­ent periods of time. You can delete some data anytime, while other data are auto­mat­i­cal­ly deleted after a certain time, and still other data are stored by Google for a long time. Some data (such as ele­ments on “My activ­i­ty”, photos, doc­u­ments or prod­ucts) that are saved in your Google account are stored until you delete them. More­over, you can delete some data asso­ci­at­ed with your device, browser, or app, even if you are not signed into a Google Account.

How can I erase my data or prevent data retention?

Gen­er­al­ly, you can delete data man­u­al­ly in your Google account. Fur­ther­more, in 2019 an auto­mat­ic dele­tion of loca­tion and activ­i­ty data was intro­duced. Depend­ing on what you decide on, it deletes stored infor­ma­tion either after 3 or 18 months.

Regard­less of whether you have a Google account or not, you can set your browser to delete or deac­ti­vate cookies placed by Google. These set­tings vary depend­ing on the browser you use. The fol­low­ing instruc­tions will show how to manage cookies in your browser:

Chrome: Clear, enable and manage cookies in Chrome 

Safari: Manage cookies and website data in Safari 

Firefox: Clear cookies and site data in Firefox 

Inter­net Explor­er: Delete and manage cookies 

Microsoft Edge: Delete cookies in Microsoft Edge 

If you gen­er­al­ly do not want to allow any cookies, you can set your browser to always notify you when a cookie is about to be set. This will enable you to decide to either allow or permit each indi­vid­ual cookie.

Legal basis

If you have con­sent­ed pro­cess­ing and storage of your data by inte­grat­ed YouTube ele­ments, this consent is the legal basis for data pro­cess­ing (Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR). Gen­er­al­ly, your data is also stored and processed on the basis of our legit­i­mate inter­est (Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR) to main­tain fast and good com­mu­ni­ca­tion with you or other cus­tomers and busi­ness part­ners. Nev­er­the­less, we only use inte­grat­ed YouTube ele­ments if you have given your consent. YouTube also sets cookies in your browser to store data. We there­fore rec­om­mend you to read our privacy policy on cookies care­ful­ly and to take a look at the privacy policy or the cookie policy of the respec­tive service provider.

YouTube also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of the data processing.

YouTube uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR) as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (which are outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein and Norway) or for data trans­fer there. These clauses oblige YouTube to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

Since YouTube is a sub­sidiary company of Google, Google’s privacy state­ment applies to both. If you want to learn more about how your data is handled, we rec­om­mend the privacy policy at https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en.

Font Awesome Privacy Policy

Font Awesome Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: service optimisation
Processed data: data such as the IP address and loaded icon files
You can find more details on this in the privacy policy below.
Storage period: data is stored for a few weeks in uniden­ti­fi­able form
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Font Awesome?

On our website we use Font Awesome by the Amer­i­can company Fonti­cons (307 S. Main St., Suite 202, Ben­tonville, AR 72712, USA). Upon your visit to one of our web­sites, the Font Awesome web font, i.e. the icons, are loaded via the Font Awesome Content Deliv­ery Network (CDN). This way texts, fonts and icons are dis­played appro­pri­ate­ly on every device. In this privacy policy we will go into more detail on data storage and data pro­cess­ing by this service.

Icons play an increas­ing­ly impor­tant role on web­sites. Font Awesome is a web font specif­i­cal­ly designed for web design­ers and web devel­op­ers. With Font Awesome icons can for example be scaled and coloured as desired using the CSS stylesheet lan­guage. Thus, they now replace old picture icons. Font Awesome CDN is the easiest way to load icons or fonts onto your website. To do this, we only had to embed a short line of code into our website.

Why do we use Font Awesome on our website?

Font Awesome enables our web­sites’ content to be depict­ed better. This eases your nav­i­ga­tion on our website, and helps you grasp its content better. The icons can some­times even be used to replace whole words and save space. This is par­tic­u­lar­ly useful when opti­mis­ing content specif­i­cal­ly for smart­phones. The icons are insert­ed as HMTL code instead of as an image, which allows us to edit the icons with CSS exactly as we want. Simul­ta­ne­ous­ly, Font Awesome also lets us improve our loading speed, as it only con­tains HTML ele­ments and no icon images. All these advan­tages help us to make our website even clearer, faster and more refined for you.

Which data are stored by Font Awesome?

The Font Awesome Content Deliv­ery Network (CDN) is used to load icons and symbols. CDNs are server net­works that are dis­trib­uted around the world. They make it pos­si­ble to quickly load files from loca­tions in close prox­im­i­ty. When you open one of our pages, the respec­tive icons will be pro­vid­ed by Font Awesome.

For the web fonts to be loaded, your browser has to connect to the servers of Fonti­cons, Inc. For this, your IP address will be iden­ti­fied. Font Awesome also col­lects data on which icon files are down­loaded, as well as when they are down­loaded. Fur­ther­more, tech­ni­cal data such as your browser version, screen res­o­lu­tion or the time when you accessed the page are also transmitted.

These data are col­lect­ed and stored for the fol­low­ing reasons:

  • to opti­mise Content Deliv­ery Networks
  • to iden­ti­fy and fix tech­ni­cal errors
  • to protect CDNs from misuse and attacks
  • to cal­cu­late fees from Font Awesome Pro customers
  • to iden­ti­fy the pop­u­lar­i­ty of icons
  • to estab­lish which com­put­er and soft­ware you are using

If your browser does not allow web fonts, one of your PC’s stan­dard fonts will be used auto­mat­i­cal­ly. More­over, as far as we are cur­rent­ly aware, no cookies will be set. We are keeping in contact with Font Awesome’s privacy depart­ment and will let you know as soon as we find out more.

How long and where are the data stored?

Font Awesome stores data about the use of the Content Deliv­ery Network also on servers in the United States of America. However, the CDN servers are located all across the world and store user data in your prox­im­i­ty. The data is usually only stored for a few weeks in an iden­ti­fi­able form. Aggre­gat­ed sta­tis­tics on the use of the CDNs may also be stored for longer. However, these do not include any per­son­al data.

How can I erase my data or prevent data retention?

As far as we are aware, Font Awesome does not store any per­son­al data via Content Deliv­ery Net­works. If you do not want data about the used icons to be stored, you will unfor­tu­nate­ly not be able to visit our website. If your browser does not allow web fonts, no data will be trans­mit­ted or saved. In this case your computer’s default font will be used.

Legal basis

If you have agreed to the use of Font Awesome, your consent is the legal basis for the cor­re­spond­ing data pro­cess­ing. Accord­ing to Art. 6 Para­graph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent) this consent rep­re­sents the legal basis for per­son­al data pro­cess­ing, as can occur when it is col­lect­ed by Font Awesome.

We also have a legit­i­mate inter­est in using Font Awesome to opti­mise our online service. The cor­re­spond­ing legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit.f GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests). Nev­er­the­less, we only use Font Awesome if you have given your consent to it.

Font Awesome also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Font Awesome uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Font Awesome to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

If you want to find out more about Font Awesome and their data han­dling, we rec­om­mend you to read their Privacy Policy at https://fontawesome.com/privacy along with the help page at https://fontawesome.com/help.

Google Fonts Privacy Policy

Google Fonts Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: service optimisation
Processed data: data such as IP address, CSS and font requests
You can find more details on this in the Privacy Policy below.
Storage period: Google stores font files for one year
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What are Google Fonts?

On our website we use Google Fonts, by the company Google Inc. (1600 Amphithe­atre Parkway Moun­tain View, CA 94043, USA).

To use Google Fonts, you must log in and set up a pass­word. Fur­ther­more, no cookies will be saved in your browser. The data (CSS, Fonts) will be request­ed via the Google domains fonts.googleapis.com and fonts.gstatic.com. Accord­ing to Google, all requests for CSS and fonts are fully sep­a­rat­ed from any other Google ser­vices. If you have a Google account, you do not need to worry that your Google account details are trans­mit­ted to Google while you use Google Fonts. Google records the use of CSS (Cas­cad­ing Style Sheets) as well as the utilised fonts and stores these data secure­ly. We will have a detailed look at how exactly the data storage works.

Google Fonts (pre­vi­ous­ly Google Web Fonts) is a direc­to­ry with over 800 fonts that Google pro­vides its users free of charge.

Many of these fonts have been pub­lished under the SIL Open Font License license, while others have been pub­lished under the Apache license. Both are free soft­ware licenses.

Why do we use Google Fonts on our website?

With Google Fonts we can use dif­fer­ent fonts on our website and do not have to upload them to our own server. Google Fonts is an impor­tant element which helps to keep the quality of our website high. All Google fonts are auto­mat­i­cal­ly opti­mised for the web, which saves data volume and is an advan­tage espe­cial­ly for the use of mobile ter­mi­nal devices. When you use our website, the low data size pro­vides fast loading times. More­over, Google Fonts are secure Web Fonts. Various image syn­the­sis systems (ren­der­ing) can lead to errors in dif­fer­ent browsers, oper­at­ing systems and mobile ter­mi­nal devices. These errors could opti­cal­ly distort parts of texts or entire web­sites. Due to the fast Content Deliv­ery Network (CDN) there are no cross-plat­form issues with Google Fonts. All common browsers (Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Opera) are sup­port­ed by Google Fonts, and it reli­ably oper­ates on most modern mobile oper­at­ing systems, includ­ing Android 2.2+ and iOS 4.2+ (iPhone, iPad, iPod). We also use Google Fonts for pre­sent­ing our entire online service as pleas­ant­ly and as uni­form­ly as possible.

Which data is stored by Google?

When­ev­er you visit our website, the fonts are reloaded by a Google server. Through this exter­nal cue, data gets trans­ferred to Google’s servers. There­fore, this makes Google recog­nise that you (or your IP-address) is vis­it­ing our website. The Google Fonts API was devel­oped to reduce the usage, storage and gath­er­ing of end user data to the minimum needed for the proper depic­tion of fonts. What is more, API stands for „Appli­ca­tion Pro­gram­ming Inter­face“ and works as a soft­ware data intermediary.

Google Fonts stores CSS and font requests safely with Google, and there­fore it is pro­tect­ed. Using its col­lect­ed usage figures, Google can deter­mine how popular the indi­vid­ual fonts are. Google pub­lish­es the results on inter­nal analy­sis pages, such as Google Ana­lyt­ics. More­over, Google also utilis­es data of ist own web crawler, in order to deter­mine which web­sites are using Google fonts. This data is pub­lished in Google Fonts’ Big­Query data­base. Enter­pre­neurs and devel­op­ers use Google’s web­ser­vice Big­Query to be able to inspect and move big volumes of data.

One more thing that should be con­sid­ered, is that every request for Google Fonts auto­mat­i­cal­ly trans­mits infor­ma­tion such as lan­guage pref­er­ences, IP address, browser version, as well as the browser’s screen res­o­lu­tion and name to Google’s servers. It cannot be clearly iden­ti­fied if this data is saved, as Google has not direct­ly declared it.

How long and where is the data stored?

Google saves requests for CSS assets for one day in a tag on their servers, which are pri­mar­i­ly located outside of the EU. This makes it pos­si­ble for us to use the fonts by means of a Google stylesheet. With the help of a stylesheet, e.g. designs or fonts of a website can get changed swiftly and easily.

Any font related data is stored with Google for one year. This is because Google’s aim is to fun­da­men­tal­ly boost web­sites’ loading times. With mil­lions of web­sites refer­ring to the same fonts, they are buffered after the first visit and instant­ly reap­pear on any other web­sites that are visited there­after. Some­times Google updates font files to either reduce the data sizes, increase the lan­guage cov­er­age or to improve the design.

How can I erase my data or prevent it being stored?

The data Google stores for either a day or a year cannot be deleted easily. Upon opening the page this data is auto­mat­i­cal­ly trans­mit­ted to Google. In order to clear the data ahead of time, you have to contact Google’s support at https://support.google.com/?hl=en-GB&tid=112059870. The only way for you to prevent the reten­tion of your data is by not vis­it­ing our website.

Unlike other web fonts, Google offers us unre­strict­ed access to all its fonts. Thus, we have a vast sea of font types at our dis­pos­al, which helps us to get the most out of our website. You can find out more answers and infor­ma­tion on Google Fonts at https://developers.google.com/fonts/faq?tid=112059870. While Google does address rel­e­vant ele­ments on data pro­tec­tion at this link, it does not contain any detailed infor­ma­tion on data retention.
It proofs rather dif­fi­cult to receive any precise infor­ma­tion on stored data by Google.

Legal basis

If you have con­sent­ed to the use of Google Fonts, your consent is the legal basis for the cor­re­spond­ing data pro­cess­ing. Accord­ing to Art. 6 Para­graph 1 lit. a GDPR (Consent) your consent is the legal basis for the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data, as can occur when it is processed by Google Fonts.

We also have a legit­i­mate inter­est in using Google Font to opti­mise our online service. The cor­re­spond­ing legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests). Nev­er­the­less, we only use Google Font if you have given your consent to it.

Google also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Google uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Google to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

You can find more infor­ma­tion on which data is gen­er­al­ly retained by Google and what this data is used at https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en-GB.

Google Fonts Local Privacy Policy

On our website we use Google Fonts, by the company Google Inc. The respon­si­ble entity for the Euro­pean area is Google Ireland Limited (Gordon House, Barrow Street Dublin 4, Ireland). We have inte­grat­ed Google fonts locally, i.e. on our web server and not on Google’s servers. This means that no con­nec­tion to Google’s servers and there­fore no data trans­fer or reten­tion take place.

What are Google Fonts?

Google Fonts was pre­vi­ous­ly called Google Web Fonts. It is an inter­ac­tive list with over 800 fonts which Google offer for free use. With the use of Google Fonts, it is pos­si­ble to utilise fonts without upload­ing them to your own server. In order to prevent any trans­fer of infor­ma­tion to Google’s servers, we down­loaded the fonts to our own server. This way we can comply with data privacy and do not trans­mit any data to Google Fonts.

MyFonts Privacy Policy

We use the web font service MyFonts for our website. The provider of this service is the Amer­i­can company Mono­type Imaging Hold­ings Inc., 600 Unicorn Park Drive, Woburn, Mass­a­chu­setts 01801, USA.

MyFonts also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

MyFonts uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as the basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (i. e. outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway, and thus espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). Stan­dard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses (SCC) are legal tem­plates pro­vid­ed by the EU Com­mis­sion. Their purpose is to ensure that your data com­plies with Euro­pean data privacy stan­dards, even if your data is trans­ferred to and stored in third coun­tries (such as the USA). With these clauses, MyFonts commits to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data, even if it is stored, processed and managed in the USA. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847.

You can find out more about the data that is processed through the use of MyFonts in their Privacy Policy at https://www.monotype.com/legal/privacy-policy.

Google Maps Privacy Policy

Google Maps Privacy Policy Overview

Affect­ed parties: website visitors
Purpose: service optimisation
Processed data: data such as entered search terms, IP address as well as lat­i­tude and lon­gi­tude coordinates.
You can find more details on this in the Privacy Policy below.
Storage dura­tion: depend­ing on the retained data
Legal bases: Art. 6 para. 1 lit. a GDPR (consent), Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate interests)

What is Google Maps?

On our website we use Google Maps of the company Google Inc. (1600 Amphithe­atre Parkway Moun­tain View, CA 94043, USA). With the use of Google Maps, we can show you loca­tions in a better way and can there­fore adjust our service to your needs. Due to the util­i­sa­tion of Google Maps, data gets trans­ferred to Google and is saved on Google’s servers. In the fol­low­ing, we want to explain in detail what Google Maps is, why we use this Google service, what data is stored and how you can prevent this.

Google Maps is an inter­net maps service of the company Google Inc. With Google Maps you can search for exact loca­tions of cities, sights, accom­mo­da­tions or busi­ness­es online via a PC, a tablet or an app. If busi­ness­es are rep­re­sent­ed on Google My Busi­ness, the respec­tive loca­tion as well as other infor­ma­tion about the company are shown there. In order to show route direc­tions, a location’s map sec­tions can be inte­grat­ed in a website through a HTML-code. Google Maps depicts the earth’s surface as either a road map or as air and satel­lite images. Due to the street view and high-quality satel­lite images, it is pos­si­ble for exact rep­re­sen­ta­tions to be made.

Why do we use Google Maps on our website?

The efforts we make on this page have the goal of giving you a useful and mean­ing­ful expe­ri­ence on our website. Through the inte­gra­tion of Google Maps, we can offer you essen­tial infor­ma­tion on various loca­tions. There­fore, you can spot our office address with one glance. Fur­ther­more, the route direc­tions always show you the best and fastest way to us. You can retrieve the route direc­tions for trav­el­ing either by car, by public trans­port, on foot or by bike. The inte­gra­tion of Google Maps is a part of our cus­tomer service.

What data is stored by Google Maps?

For Google Maps to offer its full ser­vices, the company must collect and store your data. This includes your entered search terms, your IP-address as well as your lon­gi­tude and lat­i­tude coor­di­nates. When you use the route-planner func­tion, the entered start address is stored also. However, this data reten­tion happens on Google Maps‘ web­sites. We can only inform you about it but cannot influ­ence it in any way. Since we have includ­ed Google Maps on our website, Google will set at least one cookie (Name: NID) into your browser. This cookie saves data on your user behav­iour. Google pri­mar­i­ly uses this data to opti­mise ist own ser­vices and to provide you with indi­vid­ual, per­son­alised advertisements.

The fol­low­ing cookies are set in your browser due to the inte­gra­tion of Google Maps:

Name: NID
Value: 188=h26c1Ktha7fCQTx8rXgLyATyITJ112059870‑5
Purpose: Google uses NID in order to adjust adver­tis­ments to your Google search­es. With the cookie’s help Google “remem­bers“ your most fre­quent­ly entered search queries or your pre­vi­ous inter­ac­tion with ads. That way you always receive cus­tomised ader­tis­ments. The cookie con­tains a unique ID, wich Google uses to collect your per­son­al set­tings for adver­tis­ing porposes.
Expi­ra­tion date: after 6 months

Note: We cannot guar­an­tee com­plete­ness of the infor­ma­tion on saved data. This is, because espe­cial­ly con­cern­ing the use of cookies, changes can happen anytime. To iden­ti­fy the cookie NID, a test page was created, to which Google Maps was included.

How long and where is the data stored?

There are Google servers in data centres across the entire planet. However, most servers are in America. For this reason, your data is widely stored in the USA. Here you can read in detail about where the Google servers are located: https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/?hl=en

Google dis­trib­utes data to various data car­ri­ers. This makes it pos­si­ble to retrieve the data faster and to better protect it from pos­si­ble attempt­ed manip­u­la­tions. Every server has emer­gency pro­grams. Thus, should for example a problem with Google’s hard­ware occur or should a natural dis­as­ter impact the servers, any data will quite cer­tain­ly stay protected.

More­over, Google saves some data for a spec­i­fied period. With some other data on the other hand, Google only offers the oppor­tu­ni­ty for delet­ing it man­u­al­ly. Fur­ther­more, the company anonymis­es infor­ma­tion (e.g. adver­tis­ing data) in server logs, by delet­ing a part of the IP-address and cookie infor­ma­tion after 9 to 18 months.

How can I erase my data, or prevent data retention?

Due to the auto­mat­ic delete func­tion for loca­tion and activ­i­ty data, which was intro­duced in 2019, infor­ma­tion that is used for deter­min­ing your loca­tion and web or app activ­i­ty is saved for either 3 or 18 months, depend­ing on your pre­ferred deci­sion, and is deleted there­after. Fur­ther­more, it is pos­si­ble to delete this data man­u­al­ly from your browser history via your Google account anytime. If you want to prevent the deter­mi­na­tion of your loca­tion alto­geth­er, you must pause the cat­e­go­ry “Web and app activ­i­ty” in your Google account. Click on “Data and per­son­al­i­sa­tion” and then choose the option “Activ­i­ty con­trols”. Here you can switch the activ­i­ties on or off.

More­over, in your browser you can deac­ti­vate, delete or manage indi­vid­ual cookies. This func­tion can differ a little, depend­ing on what browser you are using. The fol­low­ing instruc­tions will show you how to manage cookies in your browser:

Chrome: Clear, enable and manage cookies in Chrome 

Safari: Manage cookies and website data in Safari 

Firefox: Clear cookies and site data in Firefox 

Inter­net Explor­er: Delete and manage cookies 

Microsoft Edge: Delete cookies in Microsoft Edge 

If you gen­er­al­ly do not want to permit any cookies, you can set up your browser in a way that ensures you get informed when­ev­er a cookie is about to be placed. That way you can decide to either permit or refuse every single cookie.

Please note, that when using this tool, your data may also be stored and processed outside the EU. Most third coun­tries (includ­ing the USA) are not con­sid­ered secure under current Euro­pean data pro­tec­tion law. Data to inse­cure third coun­tries must not simply be trans­ferred to, stored and processed there unless there are suit­able guar­an­tees (such as EU Stan­dard Con­trac­tu­al Clauses) between us and the non-Euro­pean service provider.

Legal basis

If you have con­sent­ed to the use of Google Maps, your consent is the legal basis for the cor­re­spond­ing data pro­cess­ing. Accord­ing to Art. 6 para­graph 1 lit. a GDPR (consent) this consent is the legal basis for the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data, as can occur when processed by Google Maps.

We also have a legit­i­mate inter­est in using Google Maps to opti­mise our online service. The cor­re­spond­ing legal basis for this is Art. 6 para. 1 lit. f GDPR (legit­i­mate inter­ests). Nev­er­the­less, we only use Google Maps if you have given your consent to it.

Google also process­es data in the USA, among other coun­tries. We would like to note, that accord­ing to the Euro­pean Court of Justice, there is cur­rent­ly no ade­quate level of pro­tec­tion for data trans­fers to the USA. This can be asso­ci­at­ed with various risks to the legal­i­ty and secu­ri­ty of data processing.

Google uses stan­dard con­trac­tu­al clauses approved by the EU Com­mis­sion as basis for data pro­cess­ing by recip­i­ents based in third coun­tries (outside the Euro­pean Union, Iceland, Liecht­en­stein, Norway and espe­cial­ly in the USA) or data trans­fer there (= Art. 46, para­graphs 2 and 3 of the GDPR). These clauses oblige Google to comply with the EU‘s level of data pro­tec­tion when pro­cess­ing rel­e­vant data outside the EU. These clauses are based on an imple­ment­ing order by the EU Com­mis­sion. You can find the order and the clauses here: https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2847

If you want to find out more about Google’s data pro­cess­ing, we rec­om­mend you to read the company’s own Privacy Policy at https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en-GB.

All texts are copyrighted.